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How do you know if a salesperson is plugged in?

A light bulb is nothing more than that unless it’s turned on!  Every morning we all wake up with a certain amount of energy.  Some salespeople have more than others.  Some don’t have a full tank of gas.  If they don’t have the physical and psychological energy to prospect — they won’t prospect.  The SPQ Sales Call Reluctance assessment will also tell you whether the salesperson you are considering has enough energy to prospect consistently.  It can be costly to hire someone who is “all talk and no action.”

Connie Kadansky, Sales Call Reluctance coach can help you hire salespeople who can and will prospect consistently. Call today 602-380-5431

Sales prospecting takes physical and psychological energy!

Many years ago I read an article about Mr. Huntsman, a commercial building contractor from Utah.  He disclosed that part of his interviewing process was to take a walk with anyone he was considering hiring.  If the person sauntered along. . . he knew that person would not be a good fit for his organization.  If they walked briskly and energetically, he was pleasantly impressed.  Now obviously, he had other criteria. . . however, this was his final “test.”

Sales prospecting takes physical and psychological energy.

How do you know if the candidate you are interviewing has sufficient energy to sustain positive activities throughout the day?

Every day we all wake up with so much “gas in our gas tank.”   Someone people just don’t come with a full tank of gas.  The SPQ Gold will tell you about the “motivation” level — which is how much psychological and physical energy they have.

If salespeople experience Sales Call Reluctance, they are in fear and fear is physical.  They leak energy that could be used for proactive sales prospecting into unproductive activities, like surfing the internet, building their prospect list . . . you know what I mean!

Can you afford to hire someone who does not come with a “full tank of gas?”

Connie Kadansky helps CEOs, sales VPs, sales managers from diverse industries hire salespeople who will prospect consistently.

Tell me about your first selling experience.

My favorite interview inquiry is:  “Tell me about your first selling experience.”   Go ahead ask someone who enjoys selling!  They usually sit up and with great energy start talking about “selling rocks” or “selling newspaper subscriptions” or “selling girl scout cookies.”  It is so much fun to hear the stories and their interpretation of early success.

When I was five-years old, my neighbor Irena who was a volunteer for Veterans of Foreign Wars, asked me to sell poppies on Veterans Day to “everyone” in the neighborhood.  What a wonderful challenge.  I remember knocking on doors and if no one was home, I would go back until they bought a poppy.  When I gave Irena all the money plus tips, she was amazed and asked if I would sell more.  Sure!  I walked into the lobby of the car dealership in Coalville, Utah, and asked “who wants to buy a poppy?”  I sold every poppy in one sales call.  It was a thrill. Asking someone to buy and having them say “yes.”

On the other hand, ask someone who doesn’t particularly enjoy selling and usually their body language will say it all.  Sometimes they take a deep breath or sigh and/or if not particularly disciplined — even groan.

Salespeople who enjoy the selling process are golden!  They have what cannot be trained or coached into them — positive early memories that are wired into their brains.

Please start asking and share the comments!  We want to hear from you!